post

Hearing aids are music to the ears of this concert violinist

Twenty seven year old musician, Erin, is a first violinist for the Cairns Concert Orchestra, leader of the Cairns Chamber Ensemble and a member of the string quartet Strings 4. Erin’s achievements are all the more impressive, knowing that she has had a degenerative hearing loss for almost twenty years.

As a young child, Erin’s hearing loss went undetected, as it seemed impossible that an extremely talented, budding violinist, who relies heavily on sound precision, could be having hearing issues.

It wasn’t until Erin was 15 years old, after turning the TV volume up consistently loudly, that Erin saw Dr John Wells, who diagnosed her with 20 per cent degenerative hearing loss and was immediately referred to Australian Hearing Cairns.

The team at Australian Hearing assessed Erin further and recommended for her to be fitted with hearing devices, a time Erin remembers vividly:
“Australian Hearing suggested I bring my violin to the fitting, which was a brilliant idea, as we were able to fit my hearing aids to suit my violin volumes. I remember hearing sounds again for the first time in years, including birds singing. It was funny, I actually thought the birds were inside my head as they sounded that close – much to the amusement of everyone around me,” Erin laughed.

School was often a lonely time for Erin. Erin noticed her hearing loss from as early as eight years old, but because her hearing loss wasn’t detected until her mid-teens, it meant that she missed out on social conversations, which often lead to lack of friendships.

Today, Erin has a number of very close friends, and has been living with her partner, Robbie Johnstone, accomplished conductor and violinist, for the last 7 years.

By day, Erin is a Payroll Officer and by night, loves playing in her various music groups, especially performing Classical pieces and modern movie themes. Erin said of her relationship with Australian Hearing:

“Australian Hearing has been fantastic to me, they are like family. They always fit my appointment times around me, not them. The best thing is, that they have fitted me with new hearing aids, as technology advances. Previously, people used to sound like robots to me when I wore my aids.”

“Now, with my new aids, the difference is dramatic. The volume levels are perfect, the filters are so much better, which means I can focus on the sound brilliantly.”

Erin’s Italian made violin is a treasured possession. But her most treasured possession of all are her Siemens hearing devices, fitted by Australian Hearing, because without her hearing aids, there would be no music in her life.

post

Top Five Live Music Venues in London

London is well-known for its music scene and venues. Irrespective of whatever kind of event it is, whether it is corporate conference, live music, simple get-together, or a seminar, venues in London suit perfectly for your requirements. Here are top 5  http://nebraskaturfgrass.com/forums/topic/worst-pests-of-2015/page/27/ live music venues in London  that are worth taking a look.

go to site Boisdale

Boisdale is one of the new venues in London playing the live music. It has gained reputation very quickly and is famous for live Jazz and other performances. Popularity of this particular venue has gone up due to convivial and comfortable surroundings, and top0class facilities. Restaurants at the venue have Scottish-themed menu, including Scottish smoked salmon and lavish Angus beef steak, with super collection of whiskies. Boisdale tops the list with top-notch amenities and stands as the best choice for people who want a great night out.

buy Lyrica usa New Cross Inn

New Cross Inn is one of the greatest pub music venues in London. This particular venue has got very good reputation for hosting some of the best shows and also offers opportunities to few local bands to showcase their talent to public, and prove their worth. With small stage and friendly surroundings, fans can get very close to the musicians. Modest price also allows people to enjoy the live music venues without any concern about high expenses. New Cross inn is a musical gem in the chain of pubs present in London. There is an open mic on Tuesday nights and you can enter for free until 2am.

Nambucca

Nambucca on Holloway Road in London is one of the popular venues for new and upcoming bands to perform and gain good reputation. It was reopened in the year 2010 after being destroyed by a major fire in the year 2008. You can find gigs on every weekend or once in weekday. Other childish entertainments here include Street Fighter 2, Classic Pinball Table, Table Football, and Arcade Machine.

The Black Sheep

The Black Sheep is a brilliant live music venue in London that has won lots of accolades for its superior quality. It is located in Croydon and stages several indie and rock nights. It also hosts break dancing, hip hop, and other genres such as dubstep and techno heads. It is considered as one of the popular clubs for fans, with most of the nights free till 9:00 pm, and you can find open mic night every 3rd Saturday.

The Half Moon

The Half Moon is one of the favourites for London music lovers and still one of the longest running venues.  It has got a pub with more space for hangers and to enjoy the fine wine, food, and delightful company.

The venue has been hosting live events since 1963; apart from live music, it has got an outstanding jukebox for music lovers.

Other Venues to Consider

The Old Blue Last is considered as the coolest pub in the world. In the past, several eye-catching performances from Arctic Monkeys, Diplo, Young Knives, and Lightspeed Champion have been hosted here.

So, go ahead and have a blast at any of these venues, and enjoy great live music in UK.

post

Netflix Is Releasing 80 Original Movies Next Year, So Get Ready to Never Leave Your House in 2018

Yesterday Ted Sarandos, Netflix’s “content chief,” whose job title makes him sound like a blogger, announced the streaming service is planning on releasing 80 original movies next year. That amounts to roughly three movies every 2 weeks.

It’s a big gambit for a company still in the fledgling stages of functioning as a de facto distributing studio. But they’ve got the money to burn, and a lot of the experiments have paid off so far. Okja is a huge, silly movie that most studios wouldn’t have touched. Gerald’s Game is one of the genre highlights of the year. The newly released Noah Baumbach film The Meyerowitz Stories is doing quite well, too, as part of Adam Sandler’s never-ending cycle of “make one good movie, earn some goodwill, and then immediately make 20 bad movies.”

There also have been some real misfires, like the horror dud Death Note and, you know, a bunch of those aforementioned Adam Sandler movies. In fact, a cursory glance at all the movies released by Netflix so farhas a pretty alarming number of “huh?”s.

One of the big hurdles for Netflix to jump will be the reception to Bright, a big-budget fantasy sci-fi with an A-list cast. The previews so far have been…questionable, and might end up reining in some of Netflix’s more ambitious dreams of toppling the Hollywood blockbuster machine. But in any case, gear yourself up for dozens and dozens of new releases added to your queue next year. And don’t forget to actually go to the movies now and again. It’s fun and you can buy a diet Coke for $7.50 if you want. Can’t do that at home.

post

In $121M debut, ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ and Disney flex their might

“Thor: Ragnarok” thundered to one of the year’s best box-office debuts with an estimated $121 million domestically, proving again — just as its flexing its muscle — the might of the Walt Disney Co.

The robust debut for Marvel’s third “Thor” movie was a welcome shot in the arm for Hollywood and theater owners who have suffered through a terrible October at the box office. “Thor: Ragnarok” also bucked the trend of diminishing returns for sequels. The 2011 “Thor” debuted with $65.7 million; 2013’s “Thor: The Dark World” opened with $85.7 million.

“In this business, it’s not often you see the second and third installments in the franchise outpacing the previous issue,” said David Hollis, Disney’s distribution chief. “You don’t expect never-ending returns when it comes to sequels, but it definitely speaks to the quality of the talent at the Marvel Studios team and the way they’re thinking about each film out of the gate.”

The weekend’s other new nationwide release, STX Entertainment’s “A Bad Moms Christmas,” opened with $17 million over the weekend and $21.6 million since opening Wednesday, according to studio estimates Sunday. The holiday-themed sequel, which returns stars Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn, came in shy of the 2016 original’s $23.8 million opening.

Disney isn’t alone in being able to roll out such blockbusters but three of the year’s five $100 million-plus releases are theirs. (Disney’s other two are “Beauty and the Beast” and “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”) The studio has recently, as reported by The Wall Street Journal earlier this week, pushed new terms to theater owners, saying it will demand a 65 percent cut of ticket sales for its upcoming “Star Wars” film “The Last Jedi,” as opposed to the more typical 60 percent.

Hollis declined to discuss the studio’s negotiations with theaters but said, “We’re hopeful that our big films will help drive our mutual success.”

The Los Angeles Times also said Friday that Disney barred its critic from attending “Thor: Ragnarok” after the paper published an investigative report about Disneyland’s business ties with the city of Anaheim. In a statement Friday, Disney said that the two-piece report showed “a complete disregard for basic journalistic standards.”

The issue of revenue splitting is an acute one for theater owners who are already fighting against up-and-down ticket sales and mounting competition from streaming outlets. Disney plans to launch a streaming service in 2019 that will include some film releases.

It’s often been feast or famine this year at the box office. August was historically dismal, September swung to record-breaking highs, and October again badly slumped with the lowest overall gross in a decade. The year is running down 4.8 percent off last year’s record pace according to comScore.

Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore, expects November will, thanks to “Thor,” Warner Bros.’ “Justice League” and the Disney-Pixar release “Coco,” swing back up.

“It’s like a tennis match. We’re up. We’re down. It’s not for the faint of heart,” Dergarabedian said. “The industry has its work cut out for it to make up that nearly 5 percent deficit as we hit the home stretch of what has been an incredibly volatile box-office year.”

The huge “Thor” opening also cements the unlikely breakthrough of New Zealand director Taika Waititi, who shepherded the $180 million production to Marvel’s best reviews since 2008’s “Iron Man.” The movie scored a 93 percent fresh rating from Rotten Tomatoes and an “A” CinemaScore from audiences.

Waititi, 42, is a veteran of the cult comedy series “Flight of the Concords” and has previously directed largely offbeat irreverent indies like the deadpan vampire tale “What We Do in the Shadows” and the oddball outlaw comedy “Hunt for the Wilderpeople.”

But the makers of some franchise tentpoles have increasingly turned to more irreverent filmmakers to lend their blockbusters a more comic swagger. The results have been mixed. Phil Lord and Chris Miller departed the stand-alone Han Solo film after creative disagreements, as did original “Ant-man” helmer Edgar Wright.

Yet “Thor: Ragnarok,” from a screenplay by Eric Pearson, had no such troubles in returning Chris Hemsworth in the titular role along with franchise regular Tom Hiddleston as Loki. Also brought in was Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk, Tessa Thompson as Valkyrie and Cate Blanchett, as the film’s villain, Hela.

Several films opened in limited release, including Greta Gerwig’s coming-of-age tale “Lady Bird,” with Saoirse Ronan. On four screens in New York and Los Angeles, the A24 release drew some of the most packed theaters of the year with a $93,903 per-screen average.

Rob Reiner’s “LBJ,” with Woody Harrelson, debuted with $1.1 million in 659 theaters. Richard Linklater’s “Last Flag Flying,” with Bryan Cranston, Steve Carell and Laurence Fishburne, brought in a per-screen average of $10,500 in four theaters.